This retro motorhome is one of the most versatile motorhomes you will ever find

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Image of the article titled This retro motorhome is one of the most versatile motorhomes you've ever found

Photo: Happier camper

Travel trailers tend to offer limited flexibility when buying a layout and that’s what you’re stuck with for your property. The Happier Camper HC1 removes these limitations. Its modular floor and huge tailgate make it probably one of the most versatile RVs on the road.

I was recently amazed by the ease of customization of the Sea-Doo Switch Pontoon Boat and wished that more vehicles were built like this. The motorhome world could benefit from such a similarity. While trailer buyers can get different setups, they’re usually stuck with whatever they get. It is not possible to go back and move the sink or convert it to a utility trailer for a day, at least not easily.

The people of Happier camper think they have the solution with their HC1 motorhome and its building block floor.

Image of the article titled This retro motorhome is one of the most versatile motorhomes you've ever found

Photo: Happier camper

The HC1 starts out as a retro-styled motorhome. It is constructed with a double fiberglass hull for added strength and its design resembles travel trailers from the 1950s and 1960s. It is 10 feet long for the hull and 13 feet in total.

Fiberglass not only gives cool designs, but an incredibly low dry weight. This is one of the reasons that I adore fiberglass campers. The HC1 weighs 1,100 pounds with a tongue weight of 110 to 150 pounds. This thing can basically be towed by anything with a tow rating.

Image of the article titled This retro motorhome is one of the most versatile motorhomes you've ever found

Photo: Happier camper

But that’s nothing new because fiberglass motorhomes have been absurdly light for decades.

The difference between the HC1 is on the inside. Open the hatch and you have a fully modular fiberglass floor, ready to set up a living space.

Image of the article titled This retro motorhome is one of the most versatile motorhomes you will ever find

Photo: Happier camper

The company calls it the Adaptive system and it offers a bunch of different cubes that you can throw from seating and storage to a sink, refrigerator, and even a dry flush toilet. The cubes snap into place like LEGO bricks and there are also places in the ground for the table legs.

The modular layout also means you can remove the cubes to have furniture outside next to a campfire or for outdoor cooking. Or you can leave some of the cubes at home and use the motorhome as a utility trailer.

Image of the article titled This retro motorhome is one of the most versatile motorhomes you will ever find

Photo: Happier camper

The trailer has D-rings all over just for this purpose.

If the little HC1 is too small, the company also offers the HCT Traveler with its 14ft hull. It’s also modular, but loses the cool hatch, so you won’t be able to ride a motorcycle in it. Its design is also retro, reminiscent of the fiberglass trailers of the 1980s.

Image of the article titled This retro motorhome is one of the most versatile motorhomes you will ever find

Photo: Happier camper

For what it loses in transport capacity, it benefits from having a shower, a plumbed toilet and a water heater. This one is still as light as ever, with a dry weight of 1,800 pounds and a tongue weight of 220 pounds.

Now for the huge inconvenience. The basic 13-foot Happier Camper HC1 starts at $ 29,950. This base price gives you lots of pillows, a few tables, and a few basic modular cubes. You can add a kitchenette for $ 2,175 and a refrigerator for $ 1,335. The 17-foot Traveler costs $ 49,950.

This makes that more expensive than Prank, a popular brand of fiberglass trailers. A 13-foot fiberglass Scamp motorhome would have starts at around $ 15,000 and even if you lose all the cool versatility, you can get a shower, stove, sink, and toilet right off the bat. It’s a similar story with Scamp’s taller 16-footer, which starts at around $ 17,000.

So you will have to decide if the new modularity is worth the giant price jump. Still I’m glad these things exist and hope that even more manufacturers will embark on modular designs.


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