The one stop shop for buying art in rickshaws

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Have you been fascinated by the art of the rickshaw? This shop offers rickshaw art for decorating your home. Find out what started One Culture and what it plans to do next

September 17, 2021, 10:35 a.m.

Last modification: September 17, 2021, 10:40 AM

Shwapnil loves to collect unique pieces for his house. Her great passion for these items keeps her busy searching Facebook for items to decorate the house. One fine day, she stumbled across an eccentric painted tin rickshaw ripening (traditional storage jar for puffed rice) on her newsfeed that immediately caught her attention.

“The cans of ripe are so obsolete that I almost forgot that such things exist. Even though we have a common practice of consuming muri with a mixture of chanachur, my mother kept the muri in a typical floral printed plastic pot. .

Every time I went to my ancestor’s village I would see this box but it looked worn out, even boring. I never thought that a box of ripening could have such an appeal that I would have to buy it. Now muri is still on my grocery list just to use the cute storage box I display on my shelf, ”Swapnil said.

Photo: Noor-A-Alam / TBS

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Photo: Noor-A-Alam / TBS

The store’s name is “One Culture,” where the 30-year-old service holder has found the ripening tin eye-catching. But not just cans, the boutique is a one-stop solution to renovating and renovating your home with a diverse selection of household accessories embellished with the powerful traits of the art of the rickshaw.

The idea of ​​“One Culture” was conceptualized when Sumaina Abedin threw a “rickshaw painting” themed party for her friends and family after returning to Bangladesh from Canada. The party featured all the traditional items of Bangali, such as kettles, buckets, clay pots, pitchers, stools and trunks.

“When I moved to Canada I had everything but a Bangali touch was missing. On every occasion I could feel how far removed I am from my heritage and culture. And during the celebrations of the Bangla festivities in Canada. , I felt that something that represents our folk art or our heritage should have been here. It motivated me to start a business that represents our local art, ”said Sumaina Abedin.

Photo: Noor-A-Alam / TBS

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Photo: Noor-A-Alam / TBS

Photo: Noor-A-Alam / TBS

At the party, Sumaina’s guests were mesmerized by the flamboyantly decorated party. Although many organizations work with rickshaw paint, it was during this party that guests were able to truly feel the essence of art and appreciate it so closely.

“They could touch objects and see what a room looks like on a center table or how a pot might be depicted on a dining room shelf,” Sumaina Abedin told The Business Standard. At the end of that party, Sumaina asked her guests to take some of the items home, which led to a follow-up on requests for more unique household items. “And so I started commercial production,” she explained.

“My youngest son helped me create a Facebook platform for my products. So when he asked me about my business concept, I said I wanted to connect the whole world through art.

Photo: Noor-A-Alam / TBS

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Photo: Noor-A-Alam / TBS

Photo: Noor-A-Alam / TBS

For me, art doesn’t really follow any religion, nor is it limited to a specific nation; art belongs to everyone. This is how the name One Culture came to mind, ”Sumaina continued.

In this regard, Sumaina harbored a deep affection for the rickshaw arts.

“The art of the rickshaw has always intrigued me, the liveliness, the story behind every rickshaw work plan,” she recalls.

Initially, finding artists was a bit difficult as the number of rickshaw artists available these days declined with the rest residing in old Dhaka. Fortunately, by searching for artists at local rickshaw garages, Sumaina was able to find an artist and through him many more.

One Culture is today a foundation of around thirty artists who bring clay, pewter, bamboo, jute, fabric, etc. to life.

Photo: Noor-A-Alam / TBS

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Photo: Noor-A-Alam / TBS

Photo: Noor-A-Alam / TBS

“We do not have an established workshop or factory like the [rickshaw art] artisans find it more comfortable to work at home. We quickly realized that they need certain environments to focus on while they are working, ”Sumaina said of his artisans.

“It was a joy to see people who didn’t know me order my stuff on Facebook. I felt really blessed. Plus, people really appreciate the art once it’s made available. Not just at the Bangladesh, but there is also a huge demand for rickshaw paint products in Canada too. My expatriate acquaintances in Canada require me to bring products from Bangladesh when I go there, “Sumaina said.

Customers often choose to choose the color combination or design patterns that result in new designs. In such cases, a mixture of the ideas of the founder and the client is given to the artists. Also helpful is the artist’s inherent talent for creating new designs.

To maintain quality, each design is only created once. Customers often ask to recreate a specific design that is already sold. Sumaina says she also makes sure to make a few changes to these controls, no matter how subtle they are.

Everything about One Culture is a reminder of the Bangladeshi heritage. Floral designs, birds chirping; each design is unique in its own style. For home or business events, One Culture party favors are available from Tk 80 to Tk 200 (for each item).

One Culture provides custom murals on a square footage basis. In addition to selling furniture, this Facebook page offers rickshaw art-themed painting installations on household furniture. You can even have your cabinets, furniture or side walls painted in a flamboyant way by rickshaw from this page.

Soon, the organization will be launching tribal designs sourced from the ethnic communities of the Chattogram Hill Tracts.

Even though One Culture has an exhibition center in Gulshan 1 where people can go by appointment, it is mostly a Facebook-based shop. As opening commercial stores will increase the cost of production, One Culture is not currently considering opening a physical store.

“We are always aware that a neutral price balance is maintained to do justice to the diligence of the artisans as well as to our customers. If production costs increase, the price will also increase; therefore, we might lose a customer base who are unable to purchase the products, ”Sumaina said.


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