Furniture Source – FYJ 5 http://fyj5.net/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 02:20:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://fyj5.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1-150x150.png Furniture Source – FYJ 5 http://fyj5.net/ 32 32 The state disciplines health care providers https://fyj5.net/the-state-disciplines-health-care-providers/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 22:59:17 +0000 https://fyj5.net/the-state-disciplines-health-care-providers/ For immediate release: June 27, 2022 (22-094) Contact: Sharon Moysiuk, Communications 360-549-6471Public Inquiries: Health Systems Customer Service 360-236-4700 OLYMPIA — The Washington State Department of Health has taken disciplinary action or withdrawn charges against the following health care providers in our state. The Department’s Health Systems Quality Assurance Division works with boards, commissions, and advisory […]]]>

For immediate release: June 27, 2022 (22-094)

Contact: Sharon Moysiuk, Communications 360-549-6471
Public Inquiries: Health Systems Customer Service 360-236-4700

OLYMPIA — The Washington State Department of Health has taken disciplinary action or withdrawn charges against the following health care providers in our state.

The Department’s Health Systems Quality Assurance Division works with boards, commissions, and advisory committees to establish accreditation standards for more than 80 health professions (eg, dentists, nurses, counsellors). Information on disciplinary action taken against doctors and medical assistants can be found on the Washington Medical Commission (WMC) website. Questions regarding WMC disciplinary action can be sent to media@wmc.wa.gov.

Information about health care providers can be found on the agency’s website. Click on “Find a healthcare provider licensein the “How do I?” section of the Department of Health website (doh.wa.gov). The site includes information about a health care provider’s license status, title expiration and renewal date, disciplinary actions, and copies of legal documents issued after July 1998. This information is also available by calling 360-236-4700. Consumers who believe a health care provider has acted unprofessionally are encouraged to call and report their complaint.

Franklin County

In May 2022, the Caregiver Program billed the Certified Caregiver Shaelynn Marie Logozzo (NC60855746) with unprofessional conduct after being found guilty of two counts of assault in Benton County District Court.

Grant County

In May 2022, the Dental Commission terminated the dental license terms of Peter M. Cha (DE00006848).

Grays Harbor County

In May 2022, the Emergency Medical Services program billed an Emergency Medical Technician Mary Lynn Jarzabek (ES61065273) with unprofessional conduct because she was allegedly not affiliated with an emergency medical services agency approved by the Secretary of Health.

King’s County

In May 2022, the massage therapy program billed the massage therapist Xing Yu Chen (MA60115256) with unprofessional conduct. Department inspectors found that Chen’s massage business allegedly failed to post massage therapist licenses, keep client records, or thoroughly clean tables and other furniture, among other violations.

In May 2022, the Occupational Substance Use Disorders Program charged Stephen Robert Adkins (CP60264602) with unprofessional conduct. Adkins, who has a professional license in chemical addiction (now a professional license in substance use disorder), allegedly disclosed personal and emotional issues to a patient, causing emotional distress and threatening the patient’s recovery efforts. He also sent inappropriate text messages to the patient.

In May 2022, the Board of Nursing charged a registered nurse Bryan David Maruhashi (RN60563235) with unprofessional conduct after being found guilty of four counts of assault in King County Superior Court.

In May 2022, the massage therapy program billed the massage therapist Donovan Paul Loomis (MA60732442) with unprofessional conduct. The charges state that Loomis performed a breast massage without having undergone the required training and education.

In May 2022, the dental commission and the dentist Garrett J. Buck (DE60879751) reached an agreement that allows an investigator to check 10 patient records without notice, which is suspended as long as he is not practicing in Washington. He must also complete continuing education, pass a jurisprudence exam, pay a fine of $3,000 and reimburse Commission expenses of $4,000. The Commission found that Buck was practicing below the standard of care after examining a minor and recommending an unnecessary treatment plan for several teeth.

In May 2022, the dental commission and the dentist Shawn Martin Keller (DE00009100) entered into an agreement that allows an investigator to check at least 10 patient records without notice and to conduct infection control inspections. Keller must also complete continuing education, obtain a substance use assessment, pay a $50,000 fine and reimburse the Commission for $10,000 in expenses. Keller’s treatment of several patients fell below the standard of care because documentation was incomplete, crowns had open contacts, and dentures were misplaced, among other issues.

Kitsap County

In May 2022, the massage therapy program billed Jack Eric Johnson (MA60625031) with unprofessional conduct for allegedly providing a massage to a client while his license had expired.

In May 2022, the Board of Nursing conditionally restored the title of Licensed Practical Nurse to Stella Marie Guerrero (LP00040764). Guerrero’s credentials are on probation for at least 12 months and his employer must submit performance reviews. Guerrero is not allowed to work in a temporary nursing or travel agency, in a home care or community care facility or to teach. Guerrero must also be directly supervised and is not permitted to function as head nurse or manager.

Lewis County

In May 2022, the Health Secretary conditionally granted a Professional Trainee Addictions License to Caitlin Alys Rogers (CO61285861). Rogers’ credentials will be on probation for at least a year and his employer must submit quarterly performance reviews. In 2019, Rogers was convicted of theft in Centralia City Court and completed a Lewis County Drug Court program in 2020.

Pierce County

In May 2022, the Pharmacy Commission charged a pharmacy assistant Jonathan Wayne Cooper II (VB60744507) with unprofessional conduct. Cooper was convicted of assault-domestic violence in Pierce County Superior Court in December 2020.

In May 2022, the nursing aide program was reinstated under conditions certified nursing aide Joshua Michael Nicholson (NC60804330). Nicholson’s title will be on probation for at least 12 months and his employer must submit performance reviews.

Snohomish County

In May 2022, the Licensed Care Aide Program billed the Licensed Care Aide Dani Chea (NA61105935) with unprofessional conduct after allegedly dotting a long-term care resident’s genitals with Clorox, causing a chemical burn.

In May 2022, the Chiropractic Commission charged the chiropractor Gordon Aubrey Myco (CH00003460) with unprofessional conduct. He reportedly did not require patients or staff at the clinic he owns to wear face coverings or follow social distancing and COVID-19 testing guidelines.

Skagit County

In May 2022, the Board of Nursing charged a registered nurse Michael Justin Guzman (RN60802248) with unprofessional conduct. Guzman did not note a patient’s early administration of medication and did not notify the oncoming nurse. Guzman also interrupted a patient’s medication and failed to monitor the patient’s vital signs and record them.

Spokane County

In May 2022, the health secretary conditionally approved the agency’s affiliated counselor license. Sharyl Lynn Brown (CG61096012). Brown was convicted of multiple misdemeanors and crimes between 1994 and 2019, including theft and forgery. Brown agreed to probation until May 2023, quarterly performance reviews and other terms.

In May 2022, the Caregiver Program billed the Licensed Caregiver Russell Domanic Razor (NA61068384) with unprofessional conduct. Shaver allegedly stole items from a home client’s safe and pawned them. He was charged with theft by Spokane County Superior Court in January 2022. He also allegedly sent a photo of his genitals to another caregiver working at the home.

Yakima County

In May 2022, the Health Secretary conditionally approved the Drug Abuse Vocational Trainee License of Jason Louis Estrada (CO61287574). Between 2007 and 2018, Estrada had multiple convictions in Oregon and Idaho, including for criminal trespassing and driving under the influence of intoxicants. He agreed to three years probation on his license, professional supervision of his practice, and quarterly performance reviews.

In May 2022, the Professional Addictions Intern Program charged a professional addictions intern Roxanne Sanchez (CO61036095) with unprofessional conduct after receiving a complaint that Sanchez attempted to tamper with a drug test and borrowed money from patients and colleagues. Sanchez did not provide the required explanation for these allegations.

out of state

Idaho: In May 2022, the dental commission and the dentist Emerson Grant Godbolt (DE60548646) has entered into an agreement that allows an investigator to check at least 10 patient records over the next year. Godbolt must also repay the $2,000 fee, undergo continuing education, and pass a jurisprudence exam. Godbolt’s treatment of a minor patient was below standard of care related to general anesthesia and treatment that was not supported by chart notes.

Note to Editors: Health care providers accused of unprofessional conduct have 20 days to respond in writing to the Department of Health. The case then enters the settlement process. If no disciplinary agreement can be reached, the matter will proceed to a hearing.

The DOH website is your source for lots of information. Find us on Facebook and Follow us on twitter. Subscribe to the DOH Blog, Link to public health.

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Just keep your returns: stores pay you not to return unwanted items https://fyj5.net/just-keep-your-returns-stores-pay-you-not-to-return-unwanted-items/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 17:15:00 +0000 https://fyj5.net/just-keep-your-returns-stores-pay-you-not-to-return-unwanted-items/ In recent weeks, some of the biggest chain stores, including Target (TGT), walmart, (WMT) Difference (GPS), American Eagle Outfitters (AEO) and others reported in their latest earnings calls that they had too much inventory of things ranging from workout clothes, jackets and spring hoodies to lawn furniture and bulky children’s toys. It costs them tons […]]]>
In recent weeks, some of the biggest chain stores, including Target (TGT), walmart, (WMT) Difference (GPS), American Eagle Outfitters (AEO) and others reported in their latest earnings calls that they had too much inventory of things ranging from workout clothes, jackets and spring hoodies to lawn furniture and bulky children’s toys. It costs them tons of money to store it.

Now add to this glut another category of products that stores have to manage: returns.

So instead of piling returned goods onto this growing pile of inventory, stores are simply considering giving customers their money back and letting them hang on to what they don’t want.

“It would be a smart strategic move,” said Burt Flickinger, retail expert and managing director of retail consultancy Strategic Resource Group. “Retailers are stuck with excess inventory at unprecedented levels. They can’t afford to take back any more.”

Returned products are handled in different ways, he said. Retailers take back the customer’s merchandise, appraise it, and if it’s in good condition, re-shelve it at the same or lower price.

They can refurbish damaged returns and sell them for less or take them to liquidators to resell. They can also sell the returned products to foreign liquidators for sale in Europe, Canada or Mexico.

“Given the situation at ports and container shortages, sending products overseas is not really an option,” Flickinger said. Finally, retailers can hire third-party companies to handle all aspects of merchandise returns for them.

Each of these options, however, carries additional costs for retailers, he said.

“For every dollar in sales, a retailer’s net profit is between one cent and five cents. With returns, for every dollar of returned merchandise, it costs the retailer between 15 and 30 cents to manage,” said said Flickinger.

There’s another option for retailers to handle returns while avoiding more product bloat and that’s to consider a “returnless return,” said Steve Rop, chief operating officer at goTRG, a company that processes more than 100 million returned items per year for companies like Wal-Mart, Amazon and Lowe’s.

Just keep

Rop said his company’s customers are 100% considering offering the “Keep It” option for returns this year, though he wouldn’t disclose if any of his customers have yet implemented the option. “Keep it” return policy.

In some cases, when they determine it would be easier, some retailers advise customers to simply keep or give away their return after issuing a refund. Walmart said it had nothing to share at this time. Lowe’s did not provide commentary for the story.

“They already discount in stores to eliminate products, but when there are heavy discounts, buyer’s remorse increases. People are tempted to buy a lot only to return it later,” a- he declared.

Reimbursing customers while allowing them to keep their returns is not a new practice, Rop said. “It started with Amazon several years ago,” he said.

The offer makes sense for certain types of products – low cost bulky items like furniture, kitchen appliances, home decor, baby chairs, walkers, strollers where it is expensive for the retailer to cover the cost shipping for the return.

“Other products like children’s toys, shoes, towels and bedding raise health concerns with regards to returns. This could also apply to these categories,” he said.

Another concern with cheaper items: Stores typically offer discounts on returned goods, so the amount of money they can earn on an inexpensive return is minimal — and may not be worth the trade-off, says Keith Daniels, partner of Carl Marks Advisors.

Yet a “keep it” policy has its own drawbacks, namely: Companies will need to ensure that they do not become victims of fraud.

“One thing retailers need to monitor and ensure is that customers who become aware of the [Keep it] don’t start abusing it, looking for free merchandise on a series of orders getting a refund, but keeping the merchandise,” Daniels said.

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With Access at Risk, 2 Women Open Late Abortion Clinic in Maryland https://fyj5.net/with-access-at-risk-2-women-open-late-abortion-clinic-in-maryland/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 00:55:03 +0000 https://fyj5.net/with-access-at-risk-2-women-open-late-abortion-clinic-in-maryland/ Placeholder while loading article actions Diane Horvath leaned over the table to read the last list turns off his phone: the lights in the operating room, the furniture in the waiting room and a storage cupboard. A closing abortion clinic in Georgia offered to sell everything, at low prices. Horvath, a physician, and Morgan Nuzzo, […]]]>
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Diane Horvath leaned over the table to read the last list turns off his phone: the lights in the operating room, the furniture in the waiting room and a storage cupboard. A closing abortion clinic in Georgia offered to sell everything, at low prices.

Horvath, a physician, and Morgan Nuzzo, a certified nurse-midwife, are scrambling to raise used medical equipment, raise funds, hire staff and complete renovations to open a clinic in College Park, in Maryland.

In the seven weeks since a leaked draft opinion, the Supreme Court has voted to strike down Roe vs. Wade, the landmark decision legalizing abortion nationwide, Horvath and Nuzzo have been part of a nationwide shakeup of providers, equipment and even buildings. The National Abortion Federation has created a members-only online marketplace where buyers and sellers can connect.

“We know that patients are going to have to leave the South to come to Maryland, and maybe North Carolina, maybe Virginia,” Horvath said. “We will physically transport abortion care from the South to here. We know the patients are going to be moving, so we’re actually moving the practices, which is…”

“Bittersweet,” Nuzzo interjected.

The clinic will be one of the few facilities in the country that prioritizes abortion later in pregnancy, a term that often refers to abortion after 21 weeks due to how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention collect data on abortions, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF).

As access is restricted Following Friday’s decision, Horvath and Nuzzo expect more people to need abortions later in pregnancy as they struggle every day to arrange the procedure and the associated costs, such as the transportation, accommodation and childcare, their pregnancies will progress. The later the abortion, the more expensive and difficult it is to obtain.

The decision overturns a constitutional right to abortion and leaves it up to states to regulate the procedure. Twenty-six states ‘certain or likely to ban abortion’ following court overturn deerforcing patients to travel for procedures and exacerbating what is already a long, stressful and expensive process in much of the country, according to the Guttmacher Institute, a nonprofit research organization that supports the right to abortion.

Melissa Fowler, program manager at the National Abortion Federation (NAF), an association of abortion providers, said the decision generally categorizes member clinics and providers into three categories: some are closing preemptively, some are shifting their practices to, for example, gynecological services. or gender-affirming care and some expand to provide additional capability.

The vast majority of abortions, about 93%, take place early in gestation, before 14 weeks, and about 6% take place between 14 and 20 weeks gestation, according to 2019 data from the CDC. A very small number, less than 1% of abortions, were performed at 21 weeks or older, according to the data, but they attract the most attention from anti-abortion activists.

People may seek an abortion later in pregnancy because they get new information about the pregnancy, such as a fetal abnormality or a life-threatening factor in the pregnant person; their living situation changes radically; they discover the pregnancy very late; or they face barriers to getting an abortion, such as cost or lack of information about clinics, according to a KFF analysis and experts in later abortion.

“These are all valid reasons,” said the NAF’s Fowler. “We should be doing more to help people access care in their communities when they need it.”

Horvath and Nuzzo stood on the concrete floor in a 10ft by 15ft storage space earlier this month and inspected their loot. A $15,000 exam chair for $4,500, a used ultrasound machine that’s $30,000 new, ultrasound gel warmers, blood pressure cuffs.

They had spent a day in the previous month move equipment by U-Haul out of their homes in DC and Maryland and into storage space down the road from their clinic site, a unit in an office complex that they will lease to an investor who supports their mission, the women said.

Nuzzo has rolled out a Safe Space rainbow welcome mat.

She and Horvath talked for years about opening their own clinic, but didn’t seriously think about it until November, when the two found themselves out of work. They anticipated that the court would decide to leave abortion to the states, effectively banning it in about half the country and increasing demand, and knew that the Maryland legislature was about to license advanced practice clinicians, such than Nuzzo, to perform procedures in the clinic. Abortion.

They obtained a grant to hire an anti-doxing service and, convinced that their personal information had been removed from the Internet, published a Go to Fund Me page and watched the fundraiser unfold for months – until everything changed.

They were at dinner in Orlando on May 2 after an annual NAF meeting when the phones started ringing with alerts about the leaked opinion. Fundraising has resumed.

They surpassed their original goal of $250,000, which is about one-fifth of the clinic’s start-up and operating costs for the first six months, and will make up the rest through additional Go Fund Me donations, grants from foundation and private donations. The @prisonculture Twitter account sold T-shifts and raised more than $20,000, they said. Nuzzo’s six-person book club gave them $26,000.

“I think what the draft notice did was it lit a fire under people who said, ‘This is never going to happen,'” Horvath said. “But it was all part of the plan forever and ever. From the lowest Courts of Appeals to the Supreme Court.

“We have been living in grief for almost a year,” Nuzzo said. “Now to see other people grieving — it’s partly wonderful because you’re like, ‘Oh, you get it now. Part of it is like, ‘Where have you been?’

Partners in Abortion Care will be unique in that it will be co-owned by two women – Nuzzo is 34, Horvath 43 – who are mothers, and a rare partnership between a doctor and a midwife.

They plan to start by performing five to 10 abortions later in the pregnancy, usually a two to three day process, and a few earlier in the pregnancy, per week. Most of the women they care for will have received money from an abortion fund or practical support network and will be traveling from outside the DC metro area.

Before Friday’s decision, 43 states banned abortions after a certain stage of pregnancy, with some exceptions, according to Guttmacher. In Maryland, an abortion can be performed at or after viability if the patient’s life or health is in danger or if there is a fetal abnormality, says the institute. The parent of a minor must be notified, but health care providers may waive this requirement in certain circumstances.

Erika Christensen, a later abortion patient advocate at Patient Forward who had an abortion at 30 weeks, said a clinic that prioritizes later abortion in the DC area has a waiting list. to several weeks, which increased last year after Texas banned abortion as early as six weeks.

“Fewer providers are willing or able to provide this care later in pregnancy. There is more discomfort as the pregnancy progresses,” Christensen said. “I understand that there is an unease and a tension there for people in the public.”

Nuzzo and Horvath consider themselves called to do this work on a spiritual level.

“It’s okay to have feelings about it, but it’s not okay to use those feelings to limit someone else’s ability to make the decisions they need to make,” said Nuzzo.

“It’s tough on us, it’s tough on the staff, it’s tough on the person having the abortion,” Horvath said. “The fact that we don’t separate our emotions makes us really good at it. These patients need a lot of care, a lot of tenderness and compassion and that’s something we can give them.

Horvath is a graduate of Ohio Medical University; completed residency at the University of Minnesota; did a fellowship at MedStar Washington Hospital Center, where she pushed back against what she said were efforts to limit her defense of abortion; and had another fellowship with Physicians for Reproductive Health, which supports abortion rights.

“I couldn’t keep saying this care should be provided and not do it, knowing I had the skills to do it,” Horvath said.

Nuzzo earned her nursing degree from New York University and trained as a midwife at Frontier Nursing University in Kentucky and as a midwife at Community of Hope’s Family Health and Birth Center in the district.

“The mystery of the subsequent abortion is that it was in the shadows for a long time,” Nuzzo said. “I’m not a freak for doing this, I’m someone who will take care of you or someone you love.”

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Plan C Spring 2023 Ready-to-Wear Collection https://fyj5.net/plan-c-spring-2023-ready-to-wear-collection/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 15:05:38 +0000 https://fyj5.net/plan-c-spring-2023-ready-to-wear-collection/ Carolina Castiglioni is not only passionate about design; she’s a real connoisseur. Her sprawling new apartment in Milan overlooking the Castello Sforzesco is filled with a collection of museum-worthy furniture, assembled with a quirky, cultured eye. Its Plan C line has the same purity of lines, refined functionality and unconventional nuances as this apartment. To […]]]>

Carolina Castiglioni is not only passionate about design; she’s a real connoisseur. Her sprawling new apartment in Milan overlooking the Castello Sforzesco is filled with a collection of museum-worthy furniture, assembled with a quirky, cultured eye. Its Plan C line has the same purity of lines, refined functionality and unconventional nuances as this apartment. To shoot images for the fall collection lookbook, she had a set built to recreate a minimalist 1950s interior inspired by Le Corbusier, a space defined by a series of moving panels painted in her favorite saturated colors. .

“Clothes have to be functional, I don’t like it when the details are just for aesthetic purposes,” she said during an appointment in her showroom, which is decorated with standout designer pieces from the 1980s. 60s and 70s. Castiglioni worked her rigorous approach on spacious silhouettes, focusing on inventive outerwear crafted in the substantial fabrications she loves, playing with block colors and bold abstract print accents.

What was interesting was the designer’s slightly deconstructed take on utilitarian or sporty outdoor pieces like anoraks, parkas and bulky presence trench coats, styled with stretchy cycling pants and turtlenecks as undershirts. clothes. On a more feminine note, there were loose maxi dresses with pleated panels in crisp cotton; a particularly alluring version came in a delicate macrame floral pattern printed on rubbery cotton. Castiglioni loves unconventional contrasts; a sequinned pencil skirt in a pale shade of tea was paired with a sturdy tobacco-coloured cotton canvas anorak, while a slender shift dress in macro sequins featured sporty knit detailing at the neckline. A bold striped pattern printed on a three-piece suit also broke the rhythm of the collection, introducing a touch of eccentricity.

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IKEA India to source more local products amid rising inflation https://fyj5.net/ikea-india-to-source-more-local-products-amid-rising-inflation/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 07:02:00 +0000 https://fyj5.net/ikea-india-to-source-more-local-products-amid-rising-inflation/ June 21 (Reuters) – (This June 21 story corrects the spelling of Fargrik mugs in the third paragraph. The company misspelled the mug’s name in its post. Additionally, the company’s name has been changed to IKEA , not Ikea.) IKEA India plans to source more local products to combat rising inflation as the Swedish furniture […]]]>

June 21 (Reuters) – (This June 21 story corrects the spelling of Fargrik mugs in the third paragraph. The company misspelled the mug’s name in its post. Additionally, the company’s name has been changed to IKEA , not Ikea.)

IKEA India plans to source more local products to combat rising inflation as the Swedish furniture group seeks to better connect with the country’s burgeoning middle class, a senior executive said on Tuesday.

The company’s fourth and largest Indian store opens in India’s Bangalore technology hub in Karnataka on Wednesday, four years after IKEA entered the Indian market.

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The store spans 460,000 square feet and features a wide selection of the brand’s home furnishings and products, including the popular Billy bookcase and Fargrik mugs.

The furniture maker is betting big on furnishings in Bangalore, where rental space is more affordable and larger than Mumbai, where IKEA has two stores.

As prices soar, the average Indian is becoming more aware of spending on non-essentials.

Retail price inflation in India eased slightly in May, after hitting an eight-year high of 7.79% in April, but remained above the central bank’s tolerance band for a fifth month. consecutive. Read more

“We have to work on local sourcing, which will help us lower prices even more. We work with our own costs to reduce them as much as possible, this is how we navigate with an affordable price”, Susanne Pulverer, CEO & Chief Sustainability Officer at IKEA India, told Reuters in an interview on Tuesday.

IKEA sources around 25-27% of its products locally from five suppliers in Karnataka and aims to have at least half of its sourcing locally in the long term.

Yet high import duties have always been a sore point for global companies operating in India, with a furniture import tax of 25%.

“Import duties impact pricing and competition and it’s not a fully open market, but it’s part of doing business,” Pulverer added.

“Last year had an impact on pricing and we absorbed a lot of that and adjusted where we could.”

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

Reporting by Tanvi Mehta in Bangalore; Editing by Ed Osmond

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Travel news: La Sagrada Familia voted best attraction of 2022 https://fyj5.net/travel-news-la-sagrada-familia-voted-best-attraction-of-2022/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 05:24:42 +0000 https://fyj5.net/travel-news-la-sagrada-familia-voted-best-attraction-of-2022/ Editor’s note – Sign up for Unlocking the World, CNN Travel’s weekly newsletter. Get news on when destinations open and close, inspiration for future adventures, plus the latest in aviation, food and drink, where to stay and other travel developments. (CNN) — The summer solstice is almost here, the longest day of the year in […]]]>
Editor’s note – Sign up for Unlocking the World, CNN Travel’s weekly newsletter. Get news on when destinations open and close, inspiration for future adventures, plus the latest in aviation, food and drink, where to stay and other travel developments.

(CNN) — The summer solstice is almost here, the longest day of the year in the northern hemisphere.

CNN Travel is here with ideas on how best to spend those daylight hours, from America’s most amazing train trips and the best restaurants to attractions and theme parks named the greatest for 2022.

Cross continents

This is the year to make epic travel plans.

Scottish adventurer Louis Hall is on a 2,800 kilometer (1,740 mile) journey across Europe from Italy to Spain, and it’s all on horseback. (Big up to Sasha, her current equine companion).
And last month, Nigerian Kunle Adeyanju completed a 41 days of motorcycling from London to Lagos to raise funds for polio eradication in Africa.
And to find out which sights and experiences other travelers enjoy the most, take a look at Tripadvisor’s Top Attractions of 2022. A Spanish monument has been named the best in the world – and they haven’t even finished building it yet.

The best of North America

Attaboy’s cocktails have been delighting Manhattanites for a decade.

attaboy

But for America’s most exciting cocktail scene, head to Mexico City. The Mexican capital has three bars in the top 10 of the list: Speakeasy handshake, hidden behind a cigar shop in Colonia Juarez (#2); pioneer of the local craft cocktail Licoreria Limantour (#3); and Baltra barrenowned for its Tuesday martini nights (#7).
The dining scene has just brightened up in the Sunshine State, with the Michelin Guide coming to Florida for the first time. A total of 15 restaurants received those coveted stars – Joel Robuchon’s Studio Miami even had two.

Aircraft cabins of the future

CNN Travel’s Francesca Street visited the Aircraft Interiors Expo in Hamburg, Germany this week and was the first journalist to try out a new two-story airplane seat prototype, which has since gone viral.
The provocative design has generated a lot of comments, positive and negative (they already describe it on Reddit like the “human centipede” of the trip). We found it comfortable with plenty of leg room, but more than a little claustrophobic.
The seat was nominated last year for the Crystal Cabin Awards, which recognize the most innovative and creative new aircraft interior concepts. The winners 2022 include “floating” cabin furniture and seats that come with their own personal fridge.

What’s new in Italy

The Amalfi Coast is one of the most glamorous road trip destinations in the world, but its popularity has led to huge traffic jams in high season. Authorities are now limiting tourist access by introducing an innovative new entry system based on license plates.
The United States has lifted its Covid testing rule for inbound travelers just as the already chaotic summer season really heats up. Experts predict that Europe will soon be “inundated with American travellers.”
An extreme way to get some space for yourself in the Bel Paese is to simply buy your own italian village. So did Scottish businessman Cesidio Di Ciacca, taking over the hamlet historically named after his family.

40 years in nine photos

A group of five friends have staged the same photo at the same California lake every five years for the past four decades. Despite a man’s recent cancer scare, this week they captured the snap of 2022. Here is their story.

In case you missed it

It was once the largest floating restaurant in the world and housed everyone from Bruce Lee to Queen Elizabeth II.

In Sweden, garbage cans now tell you about rubbish.

Hip to be square

If only everything in life was as simple and streamlined a force for good as the packing cube. Our partners at CNN Underscored, a guide to CNN-owned product reviews and recommendations, have selected 22 of the Best Travel Packing Cubes Around so your suitcase is so deliciously organized you’ll want to Instagram it.
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France: A kitesurfer killed and several people injured after a “mini-tornado” hits the beach | world news https://fyj5.net/france-a-kitesurfer-killed-and-several-people-injured-after-a-mini-tornado-hits-the-beach-world-news/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 20:19:52 +0000 https://fyj5.net/france-a-kitesurfer-killed-and-several-people-injured-after-a-mini-tornado-hits-the-beach-world-news/ A kitesurfer has died after being thrown against the window of a seaside restaurant during a “mini-tornado” on a beach, according to French media. A strong gust of wind is believed to have caused the 31-year-old victim to crash into the building in Villers-sur-Mer, around 10km (six miles) west of Deauville on the Normandy coast. […]]]>

A kitesurfer has died after being thrown against the window of a seaside restaurant during a “mini-tornado” on a beach, according to French media.

A strong gust of wind is believed to have caused the 31-year-old victim to crash into the building in Villers-sur-Mer, around 10km (six miles) west of Deauville on the Normandy coast.

Five other people were reportedly injured by “projectiles” and taken to hospital as objects were thrown into the air on Saturday evening.

The town hall indicated that about fifteen people had to be temporarily relocated.

Image:
The bathers run to take shelter in Deauville. Photo: Samy Bouguern

A video on social media in Villers-sur-Mer showed walkers and swimmers taking refuge in buildings on the seafront during what was described by the local mayor as a “mini-tornado”.

The strong winds would have lasted 20 to 25 minutes on the Côte Fleurie between Ouistreham and Deauville.

In Deauville, strong winds caused clouds of sand as bathers ran for cover.

The extreme weather phenomenon was not predicted by meteorologists who did not expect such strong winds, Francebleu reported.

It was “a violence like we have never experienced on our coast”, declared the mayor of Villers-sur-Mer, Thierry Granturco.

Street furniture and restaurant objects flew away “with incredible violence”, he explained.

He said the surfer who died was a Parisian who had a second home on the Normandy coast, Franceinfo reported.

Mayor Granturco said the victim was “thrown with water on the wall of a restaurant, where she died.”

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Consumers are spending less due to inflation and economic fears https://fyj5.net/consumers-are-spending-less-due-to-inflation-and-economic-fears/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://fyj5.net/consumers-are-spending-less-due-to-inflation-and-economic-fears/ Placeholder while loading article actions More Americans are starting to wait to book flights, get haircuts, build swimming pools in their backyards and replace old leaky roofs – in some of the new signs that the consumer engine of US economic growth could run out of steam. In recent weeks, households had already cut back […]]]>
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More Americans are starting to wait to book flights, get haircuts, build swimming pools in their backyards and replace old leaky roofs – in some of the new signs that the consumer engine of US economic growth could run out of steam.

In recent weeks, households had already cut back on large purchases due to soaring prices, but in a worrying twist, the data suggests that consumers are also starting to put the brakes on dining out, vacation plans and even vacations. routine services such as manicures, haircuts and cleaning appointments. Across the country, business owners say rising prices, dwindling savings and fears of a shrinking economy are weighing on household spending decisions.

At Olentangy Maids in Columbus, Ohio, more and more customers are postponing or canceling home cleaning appointments. Some regulars are trying to negotiate lower prices, while others have stopped tipping altogether, co-owner Keith Troyer said.

“There wasn’t a massive drop, but enough to be noticeable,” Troyer said. “A lot of customers have called to say, ‘Hey, my wife was fired. We have to cancel,” or “Can I switch from biweekly to monthly? Before this month, that’s something that almost didn’t happen.

Consumer spending, which accounts for more than two-thirds of the US economy, held steady through April, even with inflation at historic highs. But there are growing signs that the spending streak could be coming to an end.

Retail sales slowed last month for the first time this year, led by a 4% drop in car sales. United States flight reservations fell 2.3% in May compared to the previous month, according to data from Adobe Analytics. And both high- and low-income Americans have started to pull back, particularly in services, over the past four to six weeks, according to an analysis of credit card data by Barclays. The spending slowdown is now focused on services, not goods, the bank found in a new analysis of credit card data.

“Throughout 2022, the narrative has been that as COVID wanes, households will increase their spending on services,” Barclays analysts wrote in a note this week. “And indeed, that narrative has been true for much of this year. But…spending on services appears to be slowing significantly.

Spending on services like travel and restaurants, which were up more than 30% from 2021 rates this year, has now slowed to half that pace, Barclays analysis shows.

Customers at Salon Simis in Fairfax, Va., have started cutting in new ways. Clients who previously came every four weeks now go 12 weeks between appointments, owner Ahmet Sim said. Others negotiate for lower prices or opt for partial treatments instead of highlights all over. Overall sales are down 20% from a year ago. Average tips also decreased from about 20% to 10%.

“Last month, I started noticing customers were trading like crazy,” Sim said. “They’ll say, ‘My bill is usually $500 for color and highlights. What can you do to reduce it? ”

He tries to work with them, he says, using less expensive color ranges or switching blow-dry services to less experienced stylists. But he’s also feeling the pinch of inflation: Boxes of disposable gloves have gone from $7 to nearly $25 in two years. Hair dyes that used to cost $25 are now closer to $40. Sim raised prices during the pandemic once, but he fears another hike could alienate more customers.

“People are slashing left and right,” he said. “They say, ‘I’m sorry. I can’t afford it anymore.’

These early signs of a slowdown across a wide range of products and industries, including travel and restaurants, challenge the idea that Americans have simply shifted their spending from goods to services. Until now, the hope has been that after two years of sourcing goods like cars, furniture and appliances, Americans would splurge more on vacations, restaurants, manicures and other services than they postponed for much of the pandemic.

Meanwhile, a benchmark showed growth in the U.S. services industry slowed in May to its lowest level since February 2021, according to a closely watched index from the Institute of Supply Management.

Most Americans expect inflation to get worse, Post-Schar School poll shows

“The goods side [of spending] definitely weakening, but if you look closely, so are services,” said Kevin Gordon, senior director of investment research at Charles Schwab. “Restaurant sales are down, travel spending is weakening. The burden on the consumer becomes too great, whether because of inflation or other factors, and this in all income brackets.

Overall, flight searches on the booking site Kayak are down 13% on average so far this month, compared to the same period in 2019 before the pandemic. Restaurant data from the Open Table booking platform, meanwhile, shows that the number of people eating at restaurants fell 11 percent in the week ending June 16, compared to the same week in 2019.

While lower-income families have been hardest hit by inflation, higher-income households are also starting to cut back on spending, especially as they watch their investments – from stock portfolios to homes – falter. of value, Gordon said. Household wealth fell for the first time in two years in the last quarter, largely due to a $3 trillion drop in stock values, according to Federal Reserve data.

Markets continued their volatile descent this week, with three major equity indices compounding the year’s losses and the S&P 500 index closing its worst week since March 2020.

Recession fears grow as Dow closes below 30,000 and mortgage rates soar

At Posh Luxury Imports, a Los Angeles car dealership that also leases high-end vehicles, owner Omar McGee said consumer demand and their credit scores were significantly lower than six weeks ago.

“I see more credit issues,” McGee said. “More people have cards maxed out or have fallen behind on payments. Ultimately, that means people have to be a lot more careful with their spending.”

Credit card debt, which plunged during the pandemic as Americans used government stimulus to pay off balances, rebounded for all-time highs. As of June 1, Americans had $868 billion in consumer debt, up nearly 16% from a year ago, according to Fed data.

7 Ways to Reduce Your Credit Card Debt After the Fed’s Rate Hike

And while the more affluent continue to rent Lamborghinis and Bentleys, McGee said there has been a noticeable drop in the number of tourists opting for high-end rentals.

“I can say travel is down, tourism is down,” he said. “A lot of upper-middle-class customers were coming to town and splurging, but you can see that dropping off quite dramatically.”

This consumer hesitation follows months of inflation at 40-year highs. Prices have risen 8.6% over the past year, pushing up the costs of a range of essentials, including petrol, which hit a record high $5 per gallon.

The biggest bright spot in the economy remains the strength of the job market, with the unemployment rate at a pandemic low of 3.6%. Demand for workers neared record highs in April, with about twice as many openings as job seekers. Weekly unemployment insurance claims have recently started to crawlbut they are much lower than they had been for most of the pandemic.

World Bank warns global economy could suffer 1970s-style stagflation

With workers still able to find jobs, the Fed made a sharper move this week to raise interest rates by three-quarters of a percentage point in the hope of cooling the economy enough to rein in inflation without tipping it into recession. Despite assurances from the central bank that it can pull off a “soft landing,” businesses and households are increasingly worried about the state of the economy as well as their personal finances. Indeed, US consumer confidence has fallen this month to its lowest level on record, according to an index from the University of Michigan.

Markets and households are losing confidence in the Fed’s ability to manage inflation

“The consumer is stressed,” said Douglas Duncan, chief economist at mortgage giant Fannie Mae, which expects a recession next year. “We’re seeing it in declining retail sales and increasing credit card usage. However, we don’t expect things to collapse immediately. It will be a slower decline.

Indeed, small businesses across the country are reporting small signs of customer withdrawal. Morehead Pools, which specializes in luxury pools in Louisiana, is booked until next summer, according to general manager Michael Moore. But in a sign that high-income consumers may think twice before splurging, new queries are down 30% so far this year.

“Once you go over $4 [per gallon of gas], everybody’s feeling it at the pump and they’re not earning enough up front to get over that,” Moore said on an analyst call hosted by Jefferies this week. “The cost of energy and inflation and then the cost of money…that’s really going to drive down demand in our industry.”

Noffke Roofing in Mequon, Wisconsin has seen insatiable demand during the pandemic. But lately, economic jitters are pushing many customers to patch up their roofs instead of replacing them. Many are also turning to less expensive materials, such as asphalt shingles instead of cedar.

“We’re definitely starting to see a break,” Chairman Ben Noffke said. “Customers say, ‘I know it’s time for a new roof, but can we save a little more time on this one?’ They think a lot more about their budget.

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SF Juneteenth Art Show Highlights Black Dockyard Artists – NBC Bay Area https://fyj5.net/sf-juneteenth-art-show-highlights-black-dockyard-artists-nbc-bay-area/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 03:33:05 +0000 https://fyj5.net/sf-juneteenth-art-show-highlights-black-dockyard-artists-nbc-bay-area/ A Juneteenth art exhibition featuring the works of eight black artists from studios to Hunters Point Shipyard in San Francisco – where thousands of African Americans migrated for maritime and military jobs in the 1940s – opened this week in the historic Bayview Opera House. The exhibition coincides with the new federal holiday of June […]]]>

A Juneteenth art exhibition featuring the works of eight black artists from studios to Hunters Point Shipyard in San Francisco – where thousands of African Americans migrated for maritime and military jobs in the 1940s – opened this week in the historic Bayview Opera House.

The exhibition coincides with the new federal holiday of June 19 – or Juneteenth National Independence Day – commemorating the emancipation of African Americans.

The holidays ring especially strong for the dozen black artists who create work in the former military buildings of the shipyard – where a colony of more than 200 artists have worked since the 1980s. The former navy shipyard was among the Bay Area military bases that attracted a migration of African American workers during World War II. The bases closed after the war ended, leaving their neighboring communities in economic tatters.

“A lot of families have been laid off,” said artist Dolores Gray who founded the Black On Point Collective to support black artists at the shipyard.

Joe Rosato Jr.

Artist Dolores Gray hand paints a tile in her studio at Hunters Point Shipyard Studios in San Francisco. Gray founded a group called Black On Point to promote black artists working in the shipyard. (June 16, 2022)

Gray, who celebrated Juneteenth while growing up in New Jersey via her Texas-born father, contributed several pieces to the Juneteenth exhibit. His hope is that the art exhibit will draw more attention to black artists who make up a small percentage of the total number of artists working in the shipyard.

“The show at the opera is I think important,” Gray said, “because part of what we’re trying to do is make the neighborhoods here in Bayview and the whole community more aware of what we are and do.”

Hunters Point Shipyard’s art studios are a cornucopia of artists working in different mediums – from painting to sculpture to stop-motion animation. In his studio in Building 101, artist Ahmad Walker creates stop motion cartoons featuring handcrafted black characters that appear in his series The Adventures of Brothers & Behr.


Joe Rosato Jr.

Artist Ahmad Walker sits with characters he creates for the stop-motion films he makes in his studio at Hunters Point Shipyard Studios in San Francisco. Walker said African Americans are barely represented in stop-motion animation. (June 16, 2022)

“There’s no representation for African Americans in stop-motion,” Walker said, flanked by the miniature sets where he painstakingly photographs his characters to create their movement for his films.

Walker also contributed several paintings for the opera exhibit. He said he was excited last year when President Joe Biden signed legislation declaring June 19 a national holiday, though he fears the holiday could eventually turn into things like lawn furniture sales. and celebrations without historical context.

“I don’t want something that historic to be commercialized,” Walker said, “in the sense that it’s watered down so much that there’s no flavor left.”

It seemed that what is considered a June 19 art exhibition runs parallel to themes shared by the black artists of the shipyard – who constitute a segment of the population in what was traditionally a heavily African-American region. .

Their experience mirrors the larger exodus that has seen San Francisco’s black population shrink from 13.4% in 1970 to around 5.2% in 2020.

Painter Pete Dent, who has lived in Bayview-Hunters Point for 40 years and shares a studio wall with Walker, sees the Juneteenth art exhibit checking a few key cultural boxes.

“It’s important in that it highlights Juneteenth, but it’s also important that it highlights the community,” Dent said, “that we’re here.”

The exhibition at the Bayview Opera House runs June 10 through July 31 at 407 Third Street.

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Developers embrace the passion for Pickleball https://fyj5.net/developers-embrace-the-passion-for-pickleball/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 04:19:00 +0000 https://fyj5.net/developers-embrace-the-passion-for-pickleball/ Vandalismclaims of torture and pressure campaigns are just a few of the tough tactics enthusiasts have encountered in their quest to find decent ground to practice their favorite sport: pickleball. A combination of badminton, tennis, and ping-pong, pickleball was invented in 1965 as an easy-to-play pastime. After years of quiet popularity, it surged in popularity […]]]>

Vandalismclaims of torture and pressure campaigns are just a few of the tough tactics enthusiasts have encountered in their quest to find decent ground to practice their favorite sport: pickleball.

A combination of badminton, tennis, and ping-pong, pickleball was invented in 1965 as an easy-to-play pastime. After years of quiet popularity, it surged in popularity during the coronavirus pandemic, and enthusiasts now cite it as one of the fastest growing games in the United States. Sponsors and TV stations are showing some interest in the sport, as are celebrities like Jamie Foxx, Stephane Colbert and Ellen Degeneres.

Pickleball has divided some communities over noise complaints and turf wars, but not all experiences resemble storylines worthy of a mob trial. Some cities are embracing the sport. Recently, Redondo Beach, California budgeted $65,000 for new courts and a feasibility study on the potential addition of new courts. Lincoln, Neb., has already spent $200,000 on new courts and is creating a master plan for future expansion.

Without dedicated municipal interest, however, it becomes more difficult to find acceptable places to play in many cities, and private developers are jumping at the chance.

But investors are divided on whether stand-alone pickleball facilities can become successful businesses. The lack of consensus has led to different concepts intended to appeal to a wider audience, ranging from installations with artisanal food and karaoke rooms to courts in old warehouses accented in a nightclub setting.

“Doing a project the traditional way doesn’t interest me,” said Peter Remes, who founded Lucky Shots in Minneapolis. Mr. Remes, who has started several art projects in the Twin Cities, added that he modeled his pickleball building after a “1950s country club”, splashed with a pink and green pattern that combines “a vintage style with a contemporary twist”.

Lucky Shots opened in October in a 40,000 square foot space that once housed the Foley Manufacturing Company, a maker of kitchen tools. The Minneapolis Cider Company installed four indoor courts. Life Time, which operates a national chain of fitness clubs, opened its first dedicated pickleball facility at one of its former gymnasiums in Bloomington, just south of Minneapolis.

“I’ve been in the health and fitness industry for nearly 40 years and I’ve never seen such organic growth,” said Jeff Zwiefel, chief operating officer of Life Time.

Smash Park is planning two pickleball venues in the Twin Cities. To distinguish itself from its competitors, Smash Park relies heavily on additional forms of entertainment to attract customers. Besides pickleball, its facilities include ax throwing, karaoke, and private event spaces for up to 500 people. They also offer weekly events like quiz nights, Sunday brunch, bingo, and murder mystery nights.

“The pickleball is fantastic but the profit per square foot is pretty low,” said Monty Lockyear, general manager of Smash Park.

Since a court can only have two or four active players at a time, a pickleball-only venue is unlikely to have “enough clientele to keep it afloat, even with multiple courts,” said Ronald Naples, assistant associate professor in New York. University’s Jonathan M. Tisch Visitor Center.

Food and drink is another way pickleball facilities try to attract regular users.

The Pickle Bar in Summerville, SC will span more than 40,000 square feet and feature nine outdoor courts with space for backyard games like cornhole, but it will focus on a bar and a restaurant featuring Southern cuisine, said Alisa Tolliver, a co-founder.

Throughout the Southwest, Eureka Restaurant Group is opening Electric Pickle locations influenced by the “entertainment” model popularized by franchises like Topgolf and Chicken N Pickle, where food and drink complement a variety of recreational activities.

Electric Pickle will offer items such as craft cocktails and Korean protein bowls in a setting with a rustic, underground vibe, said Paul Frederick, co-founder of Eureka, who added that the dining experience “has to be the main attraction”.

“If I have nine courts and the capacity is four per court but the project capacity is 600 people, we have to give them good food, a good stage,” he said. “We call it hitting all the sensory.”

Dining is particularly attractive now as guest wishes have changed during the pandemic, with families seeking large gathering spaces for recreation, said Seunghyun Park, assistant professor of hospitality management at St. John’s University.

However, catering facilities might not be the most appealing places for dedicated players. Pickleball’s demographics are heavily tilted towards retirees, and players have earned a reputation for being picky, territorial band.

Just like tennis, sport can also seem exclusive — some paddles cost over $200. New York City is trying to meet demand for more land but won’t renovate heavily used recreational spaces like basketball or handball courts, said Margaret Nelson, assistant commissioner for the Department of Urban Parks and Public Programs. at the city’s Parks and Recreation Department.

“We always try to balance,” she said. “People want to do a lot of things, and we have a limited amount of space.”

Some places, like Rally in Charlotte, North Carolina, are hoping to challenge the belief that pickleball alone cannot anchor a business. Although the rally will include a food and beverage element, additional entertainment options are not on the menu.

“That term entertainment makes me cringe,” said Rally co-founder Barrett Worthington. “So many breweries and concepts bring together so many activities, but we want to have a little more focused approach.”

With or without food and entertainment supplements, finding affordable space is a universal concern among startup pickleball facilities.

Electric Pickle’s first sites are being built from scratch, but Mr Frederick said he was exploring repurposed buildings for future premises due to rising supply chain costs and the length of land rights allocation processes.

Repurposed spaces that once housed big box or department stores are popular choices. Volli, a Washington-based franchise, is planning its first Texas location in a 62,000 square foot former Hobby Lobby. (Volli’s first two locations were built in furniture warehouses over 20,000 square feet.)

Allan Jones, founder and CEO of Volli, previously built family adventure parks in abandoned grocery stores. Building an entertainment site in a redeveloped space is likely to go twice as fast as building from scratch, as necessities such as parking lots and water and sewer systems are already in place, a- he declared.

Repurposing a big-box store can also present challenges. For example, low ceilings are not conducive to lob shots. Too many pillars can encroach on the space of the ground, which ideally measures 30 feet by 60 feet.

Jorge Barragan, co-founder of Picklr, opened a location in Logan, Utah that once housed a Bed Bath & Beyond and ran into other hurdles.

He said there were high costs to remove drop ceilings and nearly 25,000 square feet of flooring that contained asbestos. Some landlords would not approve a lease on other potential sites due to their unfamiliarity with pickleball.

With pickleball still largely considered a niche sport, some are selling the idea of ​​a pickleball facility by not considering it as one at all.

Inside Lucky Shots in Minneapolis, installations of large emoticons or phrases like “Sup?” exude a Pop Art feel. Since opening last fall, the club has signed up 9,000 members, many of whom have been thrilled with the vibe, Remes said.

“What I’m doing has nothing to do with pickleball,” he said. “It’s an immersion in arts and culture that creates space in a physiological way, so when they walk in, they feel something.”

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